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't -- he shouldn't be mirandaized right away. i know you agree with them. >> i think the miranda issue is an easier issue. he doesn't have to be mar lindaized for a lot of reason. first of all, they have enough evidence to convict him without getting a confession from him. all miranda gets you is a confession you can use in court. you can use that information for everything else. remember, he confessed already to the guy they kidnapped. the guy he kidnapped says, these two guys told us, we did the bombing. they got great witness and they got a great confession. maybe even better than a law enforcement confession where you can claim it was forced out of you. they gave a upon takenious confession -- spontaneous confession. >> bob wants to get in here. so then why did they need to make that statement? i'm trying to figure out why they made that statement? >> i don't know exactly why they made it. maybe because they got so much criticism -- remember the christmas morning bomber that they mirandaized right away, lost the opportunity to get information from him? so i think maybe they were pl
, everyone grows with racle-gro. >>> there was no miranda warning given. that they were claiming a public safety exception. could we get an explanation for that. >> there is a public safety exemption in cases of national security and charges involving acts of terrorism and so the government has that opportunity right now, though i believe that the suspect has been taken to a hospital. >> you heard it right there. no miranda rights were read to the suspect here last night. a justice department official says the bombing suspect won't be read the miranda rights because of a public saflt exception. so what is the next judicial step? let's ask the executive director of the american center for law and justice. good morning. i think a lot of folks are not familiar with this public safety exemption. why invoke that at this time? >> usually it's rare, it would be an instance where there is a gun or some kind of in this situation, unexploded bombs. it's important for people to understand, this is not the most extreme move. what you get from this is very limited interrogation and on top of that, it
understand if he is indeed conscious and does survive before reading him miranda rights; is that correct? >> i believe molly line will be talking about that a little bit as well. there is a loophole. there is a way they don't have to. so he was not read his miranda rights to allow to ask questions of him. we don't know if questions have been asked. they may have asked questions of him when he was under the situation he was in, of course being pretty seriously injured. they do believe he is going to make it. that was something, not only important for them to do that because that is what we do in this society but important because of this investigation. last night we were told he was being brought here for treatment. we weren't too far behind the ambulance. as you made your way through boston, you could see many of the businesses reopened. you saw restaurants and bars reopened. at one point there was a small college and 500 students had gone into the streets and blocked off all four lanes cheering, holding signs and as first responders and medical teams came through that had nothing to do
condition. a lot of talk about miranda. michael you prosecuted richard reid the shoe bomber in federal court. how unusual is it to not read miranda warnings? >> case specific. if there is an imminent public safe itty concern they should exercise the miranda exception under public safety and try to get as much information as they possibly can in order to protect the public. i think it is perfectly legitimate under these circumstances. >> judge jeanine: jay, to you when we talk about the public safety exception here. how long is that exception good for are? how long can they go without reading him his rights? >> there is no definitive statement but most people believe it is 48 hours. you a situation here where the distort accused is not conscious are in to even speak so 48 hours. points to a fundamental problem with thinking about mir randiesing. do we want a prosecution or an investigation to determine how deep the terrorist links might be and whether there were additional plans for terror activity. an awful load of weapons that the two possessed. the situation with the travel to russia. all
can he be questioned before the public safety runs out, most say 48 hours. once under miranda he is under no obligation to cooperate with authorities. >> remember the number one goal right here is to get inside his head and get whatever intelligence he has with any operatives in the united states to protect the homeland and protect americans inside the united states. >> reporter: speaking this morning on fox news, former u.s. attorney general alberto gonzales suggested being mirandized will not necessarily close off the flow of information from tsnaraev. >> we have something we can give him which is his life. for example, taking the death penalty off the i believe at that. there is possible some kind of deal would be made where he provides information and in exchange for that the government gives him some kind of a plea agreement. >> reporter: gonzalez suspects what may be happening now is in the obama administration is a quote, interagency scrum where some are pushing for a quick mirandizing. others may be advocating a delay so as much information as possible can be garnered, ma
miranda rights and there is it a safety exception that allows you 48 hour to see if there is any bombs that may be connected with the attack. under the law of war, an enemy combatant and someone who takes up arms against this country, including an american citizen can be held for intelligence purposes without a lawyer and miranda warningings. the best way to get information from the suspect is hold him as an enemy combatant. it a terrorist attack and not a common crime. in 30 days he would be presented before a federal judge and the judge could review the case that the government has. i am urging this administration, please do not lawyer him up tomorrow night. you have under our statutes and supreme court cases,le authority to hold him as an enemy combatant ting gather intelligence about what is coming our way in the future. >> there is great relief in boston today but a lot of people are concern body what might be to come whether it is it inspired by the actions or a connection, we really don't know the answer to that question yet, do we senator? >> it is impossible between now and to
and no miranda issues and question him forever . i would like to see that and i generally think it is it the better way to go here. you could question him forever and he already made a confession that is admissible to the guy they kidnapped. as far as i can tell, the guy they kidnapped he and his brother confessed they were the guys who did the bombing. >> but neither he nor his brother wanted to kill themselves . that distingished them from the cazer terrorist. >> when we were talking we didn't know what he would do. it is interesting to me that he had plenty of opportunities to kill. he was not rushing to the 72 virginings . maybe he was not sure of that process. >> do you are it a terrorist incident? >> absolute >> do you find the ft. terrorism. >> i think the administration handled this as well as they could. >> why is the case of ft. hood. >> it is a travesty. it may be a clearer terrorist incident than this is. this guy in the american military went over to the other say and working for the jihadist. we promoted him in the military because political correctness affects us
be read his miranda rights. moving past the politics of it because it seems to get a little poe lit kal, as a former member of fbi how does whether or not the suspect is read his miranda rights influence or impact your investigation? >> it really becomes irrelevant. good report-based interviewers and interrogators who are the ones most effective. the fbi doesn't do that because we're nice. we do that because it worked. in reported based interviewers miranda they can read that and continue. it is not a major obstacle. it is almost irrelevant. jenna: really? we're hearing a it is a major issue whether we get to the bottom of this investigation. so what should we consider as we continue to hear the debate ongoing over the next several days? >> it doesn't, it really doesn't make that much difference to the interviewers and especially the particular group of profile he is -- profilers they developed at quantico, at the fbi academy. this is not terribly relevant. they can sit down with the people. they can interview them. they look for behavioral cues. they look for a way to establish a relat
tsarnaev the 19-year-old surviving suspect be interrogated. should he get his miranda warnings against self-incrimination. tried in a is civilian court or military tribunal. before we go there let's start with the latest from the scene and why craig and a i immediately recognized the pressure cooker bombs. we have seen them many times before. here is craig's crime time report. >> reporter: the quiet streets of watertown became a war zone as the boston marathon bombers made their last stand here. homes can be seen riddled with bullets. this black mark from a pressure cooker bomb, one just like the one that was used to kill three people, wounding 180. >> there was two cars. black suv and a green looked like honda accord. had some bags that he was one of the guys was lighting things and throwing them. had fuses and they would explode but you also lots of shoot going on. >> brothers dhokhar 19 and 26-year-old tamerlan starr tsarnaev add to the marathon death toll, killing police officer shawn collier in cold blood. >> the police officer that was killed you said it was a massacre. >> assassinati
shouldn't be mirandaized right away. i know you agree with them. >> i think the miranda issue is an easier issue. he doesn't have to be mar lindaized for a lot of reason. first of all, they have enough evidence to convict him without getting a confession from him. all miranda gets you is a confession you can use in court. you can use that information for everything else. remember, he confessed already to the guy they kidnapped. the guy he kidnapped says, these two guys told us, we did the bombing. they got great witness and they got a great confession. maybe even better than a law enforcement confession where you can claim it was forced out of you. they gave a upon takenious confession -- spontaneous confession. >> bob wants to get in here. so then why did they need to make that statement? i'm trying to figure out why they made that statement? >> i don't know exactly why they made it. maybe because they got so much criticism -- remember the christmas morning bomber that they mirandaized right away, lost the opportunity to get information from him? so i think maybe they were playing defense
gathering purposes since he's been president. when we read these people their miranda rights and give them a lawyer the only way you can gather intelligence is if the terror suspect and the lawyer will allow you to do so. intelligence gathering through plea bargaining is not going to make us safe. jenna: so we spoke to a former member of the fbi on our show yesterday that seems to not have a problem with miranda rights, that is their opinion. we'll see what they get as far as information from this one suspect. >> can i mention something. jenna: please. >> i don't have a problem with miranda rights. this man can only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to
is remote. >> right. you know, judge, a lot of people h ve been talking about miranda, the public safety exception. i don't want to spend a lot of time on that. but, you know, when the police announced that the public threat was over, once dzhokhar was taken into custody, doesn't that suggest that the public safety exception doesn't kick in, or has been solidified? >> the public safety exception is in no way applicable in this case. that was for a situation where there was a gun in a public place and the police needed to know where it was. they asked the guy they just caught where's the gun before where was the gun? >>> they asked where is the gun. >> be that as it may you have a public defender in boston who is chomping at the bit to appoint a federal judge to defend the suspect. you could reassign a public defender is he or sheable to come in and say i don't want you talking to my client? >> he or she can say that. it's not going to stop this trying to do is to collect intelligence. i'm sure that if that's what they're trying to do, they will simply continue to do it, and gather only
washington, the decision to read the boston bombing suspect his miranda rights. last hour, lindsay graham and kel i iote said is there is no way a defense lawyer is going to let dzhokar tsarnaev talk any more without taking the death penalty off the table. he has been in custody for 60 hours which the feds decided to read him his miranda rates. joining us is mercedes cowlin and you had such different reactions to this. right is ticked off that his miranda rights were yesterday red to him. he can't speak we're told like a one word, yes or one word no, the left is ticked off it took him as long as it did to read the miranda rights. >> first of all, i to give kudos for calling it an act of terrorism to the obama administration like they called hassan workplace violence. bottom line, if they don't want to use the statements a this guy makes in a criminal prosecution, they can ask him questions all day long without murnd. they can do it after he gets a lawyer as long as a clean team, a team that is is not involved in the criminal prosecution goes in and asks intelligence related questions that
without miranda, this is because federal authorities were able to implement the... the national threat exemption. and that will allow them to continue to question him. now, just on the other side of the police tape is a spontaneous celebration, beginning with people huddled around the radios, wanting to hear the latest information h. they got the information they wanted, cheers would erupt. ultimately, they lined both sides of the road and cheered for the emergency vehicles as they were leaving this scene. the tactical teams, the police officers, the national guardsmen, all got cheers. the crowd would erupt and chanted u-s-a! u-s-a ?ft and patriotic songs, as the people here endured so much the last couple of days, very glad to see this chapter of the trag fee tragedy is over. >> we will see you again. >> what is next here? joining us now, the criminal defense attorney, james shalloc, familiar with cases involving multiple murders. he prosecuted son of sam killer, david brcko wits. i have to think, the most powerful evidence may be the videotape, the day of the bombing. it not only sho
, they suspended his miranda rights for a 48 hour period and decide whether or not to seek the death penalty -- listen to this from last night as well. >> this is still an active and ongoing investigation. we're going to be reviewing all of the evidence. before that kind of a decision is made in terms of whether or not to seek the death penalty, you review all of the evidence and it's a very thoughtful, long process that is engaged and it's the attorney general of the department of justice that makes that final decision. >> martha: all right. so there you have that. let's bring in fox news legal analyst peter johnson, jr. peter, welcome. >> how are you? >> martha: that's the u.s. attorney on this case in boston. she says it's too early to talk about death penalty. >> i was really surprised and disturbed as an american and as a lawyer in watching that last night. you couldn't think of a more weak insip mid remark that she was making. the charges that will be filed in this case, i haven't seen them, but i can approximate what they are -- are death penalty charges under federal law, including u
, as well. mccain and graham says the injured suspect is not entitled to his miranda rights. they want him to be treated as an enemy combatant. it's a non-debate for him. the mother-in-law she is sickened by the horror inflicted. the family realizes now they never really new tamerian tsarnaev, the suspect number one and cannot begin to comprehend this tragedy. we are all over the developments including something going on in the city of chicago. more on that in a second. here is what we got for you now. mike tobin in watertown, massachusetts. what is the latest on the investigation there. ed henry at the white house responding to all these crosscurrents everywhere. to eric shawn where the injured suspect remains not surprisingly under heavy guard. mike? >> reporter: neil, this is the i dill i can neighborhood where it came to an end in a blaze of gunfire. the view of the helicopter pilot had there was someone hiding in that boat. he was wounded and bleeding, dzhokar tsarnaev half an hour from the cover of night that could have allowed him to move again. there were federal agents and guns dr
, should dzhokhar tsarnaev be treated as a criminal, or treated under the miranda rule and read his rights and given a lawyer or treated as enmyth combatant with no such protections? >> i believe strongly the former. that is the only legal way to proceed. i do not believe under the military commission law that she is eligible for that. it would be unconstitutional to do that. one of the great things in america we come together at times of trial. i very much regret the fact that there are those that want to precipitate debate whether he's enemy combatant or whether he is a terrorist, murder, et cetera. federal law, we have had 435 terrorist convictions. under federal law. we had 100-plus arrests. maybe half a dozen under the military commission. this is clear to me that the course that can be taken, the high value interrogation group. they are skilled and they know how to do this. the miranda right can be read at a later time. he has reportedly been shot through the throat, he is incubated and he can't talk now. there is time to do the investigation, to make a clear assessment and move from
. >> gregg: we have toe concerned about miranda rights -- that is irrelevant. there is plethora of evidence and he allegedly confessed to the carjacking. so what do you want to do is fi out other planned attacks and accomplices? >> absolutely. you want to find out who was involved in a broader plan, if there is a broader plan. at were all the bombs that were thrown athe police, where were they slated for and is there anybody else lurking i the wings? the trick will be to chip to his heart and who is close to heart andse the leverage. misrepresent the facts, they will be arrested. >> gregg: the supreme court has said so. >> one thousand percent. this is the perfect scenario. all the leverage is on the side of the investigators. he has no idea. he is 19. he is dumb as rocks. he failed six out of seven classes in college. he forgott surveillance video existed in america by the bombing on monday. he is naive and impressionable. they can get to i am. >> gregg: you want to look at all electronic communications and personal property and his car. anybody he might have communicated with. >> it's ong
asked if he understood what was happening. his miranda rights were read to him. they decided to read him his miranda rights. those were given to him today as well. the security here is very tight. in fact, what is interesting is, he potentially might get out of the hospital later than many of his victims that are also here recovering. greta? >> adam, in terms what have went down before he was mirandized, was he interviewed by the fbi or anybody in the last couple of days since he was taken into custody? did he give him information that they considered valuable and helpful? >> reporter: we learned a cowl of things. 1; yes, there were questions asked of him. the first few hours if not more than that, they were worried about making sure should thguy survives. he got here on friday night in pretty bad condition. he bled from injuries nearly 20 hours. he was obviously in rough condition. so the number-1 priority was to make sure he survived to get information from him. questions were asked of him before he was mirandized. they haven't said of course, they are not going to give away what he sa
. and his miranda rights were read to him. there was reporting if they weren't going to, but they decided to read him his miranda rights and those were given to him today as well. the security here is still very tight. what is interesting is he potentially might get out of the hospital later than many of his victims that are here also recovering. greta. >> adam, in terms of what went down before he was mirandized, was he interviewed by the fbi or by anybody in the last couple days since he was taken into custody? and it he give them information that they considered valuable and helpful? >> we learned a couple of things. yes, there were questions asked of him. the first few hours, if not more than that, obvious think they were making sure he survived so you had that situation. he got here friday night in pretty bad condition. he bled for nearly 24 hours and then the fire fight at the boat. the number one priority for them was to make sure he survived so they could get information from him. questions were asked of him before he was mirandized. they haven't said, of course, because it's part
to know and interrogate him at this point without reading him his miranda rights. i want you to meet a former deputy assistant director of the fbi's counterterrorism division. you handled practically every high profile case of bombing that we've seen in this country, including the unabomber case and the olympic bombing. thanks so much for being with us. >> good morning, jamie, you're welcome. >> we had chance to talk in the middle of the night the other night. >> we did. >> now we can reflect. we have the suspect in custody. it seems to me this is a huge investigation still, even though there's tons of evidence. you have multiple crime scenes, multiple devices, and a million questions. what will the fbi want to know first? >> well, now the investigation really gets underway, and we talked last night in the middle of the night about the search for the subjects, but now we're really going to focus in on how did these people live? how did they exist? what were they doing in the months and the years preceding these bombings, and particularly in the weeks and days before they actually com
-value suspects is standing by to question him. officialsofficials have said thl not read him his miranda right, invoking the rare public safety exception. dozens remain hospitalized. the death toll is 3 people from the bombing and 1 others wiewbed. they are also believed to have shot a police officer, marking a forth killing. "fox news sunday" is right after america's news headquarters, and there will be more on boston police commissioner. the investigation enters a new phase as agents focus on getting answers from dzhokhar tsarnaev to questions like and how why and continuing to investigate whether anyone else was involved. michael sullivan is very familiar with these kinds of investigations, he is a former u.s. attorney who prosecuted would-be shoe bomber richard reid. thank you for joining us today. >> you're welcome, shannon. >> shannon: put on your legal cap for the first couple of questions. how do you think it's appropriate to best treat the suspect to really bar future legal challenges against any information that the government could get from him at this point and stay within the conf
with recovering right now. he's now arrested he was not read his miranda rights. federal agents electing, instead, to invoke the public safety threat exemption. th allows them to continue questioning him. meantime, on the other side of the police tape, as everything was happening here, of the celebrations were building. people were huddled around radios, as they got news they wanted to hear, cheers went out from the people of this little town, watertown. and after it was all done, a great cheer went out and spontaneously the people elected toine both sides of the road. forming a gauntlet, a makeshift parade as the emergency crews and tactical teams started leaving this location. they cheered for them, came out with patriotic songs. some of the people said they're glad it's over, they're glad that the suspect survived because he can be questioned. they also said that now is the time to remember people like sean collier, the massachusetts institute of technology campus policeman who was killed in the early stages of that frenzy and chase that ensued a day or so ago. and richard donohue who is fight
decided not to read him miranda rights. he's not getting that. feds are envoking an exception to the rule and already the american civil liberties is slamming that decision . we must not waiver from the tried and true judicial system. we'll break down the complicated legal issuings. criminal defense attorney heather hanson is wherulse. >> you catch somebody who might have left a bomb somewhere . you want to keep them safe and question them right now for the public safety. >> that times passed hasn't it. >> the law was in 1984 . that is what it at that time. since then specifically after the times square bombing in 2010, >> attempted. >> the f.b.i. put out a memo that addresses the terrorist cases that they could expand the time in which they can question a suspect without reading them their rights. the question is how long of a time is there. we don't know the answer. >> was it not the letter of the law. but was it the intent of the law to stop an imminent threat against the people. for instance times square bomber had blown something out there and had blown something that the authorities
not been read his miranda right. there is a threat to public safety exemption and that gives them the a continue to question him and find out if there are additional threats hanging around out there, jaime. >> mike tobin, thank you very much. now over to greg. >> monday's deadly bombing is being called by some the first on a large scale since 9/11. does this raise questions about how good our national security really is? will we have to make some changes? joining us is kt mcfarland our national security analyst host of fox news live def con 3. hats off to everybody in-law enforcement. >> awesome. >> they did a great job here. law enforcement in general has done a good job in foiling other terror plots. the subway bombings in new york that were planned and foiled. >> time square, underwear bomber. >> it was a citizen that helped out on that one. the list goes on and on and on. they didn't stop this one in advance. what does this say about our national security if anything? >> you have to be right -- you know you have to be right 100% of the time and they only have to be right once.
they not have read his miranda rights to him yesterday if that is the case? do you leave the door of legal opportunity open a while longer. >> there are two separate issues. the public safety exception applies regardless of the type of offense that the government is investigating, and using the public safety exception is recognized by the united states supreme court. it's a lawful way of trying to get information in a very short window of time tinge le particularly when you're concerned about public safety issues as the investigators certainly were as a result of the horrific acts that the bombing suspects, the bombing defendants who are h are accused of. bill: this is a guy to lived here more than ten years. came here 2002 if memory serves. your case with richard reid he was far from an american citizen, he was far from even making a home here. what have we done in 12 years? make sure that the prosecutions can be successful? >> i would suggest that we should be using all the tools that both the united states supreme court has indicated are available in order to keep america safe, and all
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)